Almost Half Of Top iPad Apps Are Unavailable Or Unoptimized For Android Tablets

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Almost half of the top 50 apps on iPad are unavailable or have not been optimized for competing devices that run Google’s Android operating system. That’s according to a new report from Canalys, which believes Google should be doing more to encourage top developers to build high-quality tablet apps for its platform.

The data from Canalys shows that 30% of the top 50 iPad apps weren’t available at all on Android-powered tablets, while another 18% were there but they were not optimized for larger displays — they were simply smartphone apps that were automatically scaled up to fit a tablet screen.

That means just 52% of top iPad apps were also available on Android tablets.

“Quite simply, building high-quality app experiences for Android tablets has not been among many developers’ top priorities to date,” said Tim Shepherd, Canalys Senior Analyst.

“That there are over 375,000 apps in the Apple App Store that are designed with iPad users in mind, versus just a fraction of this – in the low tens of thousands – available through Google Play, underscores this point.”

Canalys does expect this to change as Android-powered tablets become more popular, but it still believes that “Google needs to do more to encourage greater numbers of developers to invest in delivering high-quality Android tablet apps quickly.”

If it doesn’t, the search giant runs the risk of “disappointing consumers with weak app experiences in the short term.”

Of course, one of the issues with Android, which can sometimes drive developers away from the platform, is piracy. Google’s “open” approach means it’s too easy for users to download and install apps from other sources without paying for them.

Back in July, we wrote about a game called Gentlemen! that had attracted over 6,000 players on Android during its first few weeks on Google Play. That’s an impressive number of players, until you consider that only 50 actually paid for the game, while the rest downloaded it illegally.

As a result of this, many developers choose to avoid Android altogether, while other must find different ways of finding revenue — such as ads. Of the 52% of top iPad apps also available on Google Play, six were titles that were paid on iOS, but were free and ad-supported on Android.

Canalys analyst Daniel Matte points out that while these titles may be free, they “typically deliver a poorer and often more limited user experience, sometimes taking a considerable toll on device battery life and often subjecting users to unskippable [sic] videos or other unpopular intrusions.”

With Google seeing lots of demand for the new Nexus 7, and Android tablets now commanding a larger market share than the iPad, it’s never been more important for it to put more focus on tablet apps.

Canalys believes it can do this by increasing the revenue potential of Google Play, and by changing the Play Store to “ensure more rigorously managed, high-quality, optimized experiences are highlighted, to the benefit of consumers, and to reward those developers who invest the time and resources in building them with improved discoverability.”

[Via, Source]

Malaysian iPhone 5 plans comparison: Maxis vs Digi vs Celcom

121212-digi-iphone-5-launch-detailsThe Plans for iPhone 5 are all out from the big three: Maxis, Digi and Celcom. But how does the plans do compared to each other? Which is the plan that suits you most or give you the best value for money? Which is the cheapest among all? So you are all confused now on which plan should you go for and you are so undecided. Well, this will definitely help you in making that decision. Here is how the iPhone plans from Maxis, Digi and Celcom compared:

Maxis vs Digi vs Celcom!

ScreenShot2[Click on image to enlarge]

From the comparison above, we can see that Digi has the cheapest total cost of ownership compared to the rest. But if you consider the bundled calls, SMS and MMS from Digi’s plan, they are not as good as Maxis. For me, I think that Maxis provide the most value for money plans for iPhone 5 compared to Digi and Celcom. Except for the iValue Simple. In my opinion, it is not as good as it looks. It is cheap, and that’s all. I would prefer iDigi 88 than iValue Simple.

And the best part is, Maxis no longer charges for data when the data quota is exceeded. Only the speed will be throttled. But even a throttled data speed for Maxis is considered fast because the speed is reduced by 3 fold, unlike Digi or Celcom which the data will be throttler to a sad 256kbps. But note that the free SMS that comes with Maxis plans are Maxis to Maxis only. SMS to other operators will be charged.

For Celcom, a combination of calls, SMS and MMS of up to 1500 will be given. That will make it more flexible for people instead of having a fix number of minutes and SMS. And Celcom plans also comes with a huge amount of Data. So if you are someone who seldom call and SMS but uses data alot, Celcom might be the best for you.

In conclusion:

Maxis

Good: Best value for money (excluding iValue Simple). Good coverage. Excellent internet speed. Get free 1000 minutes calls for Maxis to Maxis in your contract period.
Bad: More pricey compared to the others. Concern on bill shock. iValue Simple sucks.

Digi

Good: Cheapest plans for iPhone 5. Low monthly commitment compared to the others.

Bad: Only 24 months contract. Not as powerful coverage. Slow internet speed. iPhone 5 price only subsidized a little.

Celcom

Good: Flexible calls/SMS/MMS plan. Huge amount of data. Good coverage and average internet speed.

Bad: Too little calls/SMS bundled. Most expensive when value for money is concerned.

With this, I hope you can decide better on which plan to go for when you plan to get you iPhone 5. Well maybe you have already decided, but this can make things a little bit clearer to you. So basically if you want a cheaper plan, go for Digi, if you want something with the best value for money, Maxis is the best, if you are looking for flexibility and huge amount of data, there is none other than Celcom.

Enjoy your iPhone 5 people! If you have any questions, please feel free to ask me. And please share this with your friends and family!

Support by liking littlegeeko on Facebook and twitter!!

*if you want to use the comparison chart, please at least acknowledge me. Thanks!

Maxis introduces new cheaper iValue Simple iPhone 5 Plan

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Maxis just recently announces another plan to join the iValue plans for iPhone 5 coming this Friday. This plan will be targeted to the more budget tight market. The plan just requires monthly commitment of RM50 for a 12 months contract and you will get a small subsidy for your iPhone 5.

Phone 5 16GB – RM2,079
iPhone 5 32GB – RM2,339
iPhone 5 64GB – RM2,699
iPhone 4S 16GB – RM1,769
iPhone 4 8GB – RM1,239

The plan gives you 200mins to all operators, 100SMS to Maxis and 1GB data. It looks like a good solution for those who wanted to take Maxis line but doesnt want to pay RM100 or more a month. But if you take a closer look, after some calculation, it is not really worth it. [Click on the image for a closer look on the plan]

Here is why:

iValue 1:

1 year: RM1200 commitment + RM1699 iPhone price = RM2899

iValue Simple:

1 year: RM600 commitment + RM2079 iPhone price = RM2679

The iValue 1 is just RM220 more expensive than iValue Simple which is around RM18 extra/month. With that, you will get more calls, SMS, and data. I think the iValue Simple is just not that simple after all. If you really want to get a cheaper monthly commitment plan, go for Digi’s iDigi 88 plan. That is a better choice. But you have to sacrifice internet speed and coverage for that. SO the choice is yours!

Check out plans from Digi and Celcom!

For more information on the iValue Simple plan, click here!

If you have any question at all, feel free to drop us a comment on the comment section! Thanks!

Celcom finally reveals it’s unconventional plan for iPhone 5, starting from RM98/Month [Updated]

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Celcom has revealed the plan for iPhone 5 to those who registered their interest on iPhone 5 with Celcom. So I who registered myself got an email from Celcom with the plan like above. Celcom is doing it the unconventional way without any tailored made iPhone plans like they do previously and like how Digi and Maxis still does. But instead, they offer iPhone 5 with a subsidized price when you sign 12 months and 24 months contract of the bundled Celcom First Plan + Mobile internet.

The plan is like the image above, please click on the image for a larger clearer look.

So basically, you can choose between 4 choices of plans which includes:

Celcom First Prime (RM40) + 1.05GB free data + Mobile internet 3GB (RM58) = RM98/month
Celcom First Prime (RM40) + 1.05GB free data + Mobile Internet 5GB (RM88) = RM128/month
Celcom First Premier (RM80) + 1.1GB free data + Mobile Internet 5GB (RM88) = RM168/month
Celcom First Elite (RM150) + 1.2GB free data + Mobile Internet 5GB (RM88) = RM238/month

These plans from Celcom does look good and feel different from those conventional iPhone plans. The bundled talk time, SMS and MMS varies depending on which Celcom First plan you take. And they offers monthly rebates also that also varies depending on your iPhone 5 model.

For more information, Click here.

If there are any questions, please feel free to ask! Thanks.

Cant make up your mind on which plan and which telco to go for? Stay tuned for the plan comparison! Coming soon!

See plans from Digi here and Maxis here!

UPDATE: Celcom plans are out in their website. Click here!

Maxis is the first telco you can register your interest for iPhone 5 in Malaysia

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With the news that the iPhone 5 will reach Malaysia in 14th Dec 2012, the first telco to go online with the “register your interest” page is Maxis. Expect Celcom and Digi to have their own by this week.

If you are interested in iPhone 5 on contract under Maxis, go here to register your interest! By registering, you be the first in line when the phone arrives! Have fun registering!

[Source]

iPad mini and 4th Generation iPad review round-up [Review]

Ahead of the iPad Mini and fourth-generation iPad becoming available to customers Friday, early reviews of both devices have hit the web. You can see in the collection below that the reviews are fairly positive, discussing how great the build quality is, the lightness of the tablet, and how well it fits in your hand. Starting with the iPad mini:

The Loop:

I use my iPad mini for tasks rather than watching videos or playing games, but I use it a lot. This is a Wi-Fi model, which was on all the time and I have yet to see anything cause a significant drain on the battery. The battery is lasting days for me and it is on 24/7.

Engadget:

In fact we found the brightness and color reproduction to be improved over the iPad 2, comparable to the latest Retina displays. Colors are very pleasing to the eye and viewing angles, as ever with an Apple display, do not disappoint. You can line up as many friends as you like and sit them shoulder-to-shoulder, they’ll all have a bright, clear picture. Yes, mini owners may have to make do with some resolution envy, but they at least won’t be lacking in any other regard.

The Verge:

And it does raise the floor here. There’s no tablet in this size range that’s as beautifully constructed, works as flawlessly, or has such an incredible software selection. Would I prefer a higher-res display? Certainly. Would I trade it for the app selection or hardware design? For the consistency and smoothness of its software, or reliability of its battery? Absolutely not. And as someone who’s been living with (and loving) Google’s Nexus 7 tablet for a few months, I don’t say that lightly.

TechCrunch:

While we’re on the subject of the screen, let’s not beat around the bush — if there is a weakness of this device, it’s the screen. But that statement comes with a very big asterisk. As someone who is used to a “retina” display on my phone, tablet, and even now computer, the downgrade to a non-retina display is quite noticeable. This goes away over time as you use the iPad mini non-stop, but if you switch back a retina screen, it’s jarring.

Telegraph:

On the other hand, what will make some think twice about buying an iPad mini is the price. Starting at £269 for a WiFi only model, this is £100 dearer than the Kindle Fire HD or the Nexus 7, which is now available in a 16GB version for £159.

Whether it’s worth it depends on how much of a premium you put on great design and a vast ecosystem of apps. Apple will sell a lot of these little beauties, that’s for sure.

TIME:

Even though this screen isn’t state of the art, it’s O.K. If you’ve ever laid your eyeballs on the ultra-smooth text rendered by the Retina iPad, its text will look fuzzy by comparison, especially at teensier type sizes. But the tradeoff it presents compared to the 7-inchers — fewer pixels, but more space — is reasonable enough.

AllThingsD:

In shrinking the iconic iPad, Apple has pulled off an impressive feat. It has managed to create a tablet that’s notably thinner and lighter than the leading small competitors with 7-inch screens, while squeezing in a significantly roomier 7.9-inch display. And it has shunned the plastic construction used in its smaller rivals to retain the iPad’s sturdier aluminum and glass body.

Guardian:

What will surprise you is the weight. The specs already show that the iPad mini is lighter than the Kindle Fire, 308g v 395g (and 340g for the Nexus 7); even if you add on a Smart Cover, it’s still lighter than the uncovered Kindle Fire. It’s thinner too. This is a device that will be ideal for holding in one hand for reading on train rides or other commuting; or you might even forget it’s in that coat pocket.

SlashGear:

Apple quotes up to 10hrs of wireless browsing over Wi-Fi for the iPad mini, or up to 9hrs if you’re using the tablet’s cellular connection. In practice, with a mixture of browsing, some video playback, games, music – both locally-stored and streaming – and messaging, we comfortably exceeded Apple’s estimate. In fact, we exceeded 11hrs of use before encountering a battery warning.

Fox News:

Those tablets don’t have the complete experience that the iPad does. Come on: The iPad is still the gold standard for tablet computing after all. With stellar hardware and hundreds of thousands of apps, the iPad is the Kleenex of facial tissue. The Tivo of DVRs. It has all the perks of using an iOS device: AppStore, iMessages, FaceTime, etc. 

Moving on to the 4th gen iPad:

TechCrunch:

If you were going to get an iPad before, obviously, you’ll want to get this one now. In fact, you don’t even have a choice — Apple has discontinued the third-generation model. The prices remain the same across the board as do all of the other features (WiFi/LTE, Retina display, etc).

Yes, it is kind of lame for those of us who bought third-generation models that Apple updated the line so quickly, but well, that’s Apple. To me, the fourth-generation leap doesn’t seem to be nearly as big as the leap from the first to second generation or from the second to third generation, so perhaps take some solace in that.

SlashGear:

The third-generation iPad arguably didn’t need refreshing; in fact, if Apple hadn’t opted to change to Lightning, it could realistically have held off changing its largest tablet until early 2013, as per its typical yearly refresh cycle. That makes for a reasonably straightforward upgrade decision if you’re a 3rd-gen iPad owner. Unless you’re desperate for Lightning – perhaps you’ve also got an iPhone 5, and want to use all the same accessories rather than buy the adapter dongle – then we’re yet to see apps that really demand the potent A6X chipset.

The Verge:

The fourth-generation iPad is the very definition of an iterative change: Apple made important things better, but neither overhauled nor revolutionized anything. If the iPad’s history is any indication, the fourth-generation iPad’s advantages over the third-gen model will be most apparent two years from now, when apps are designed for the better processor and the Lightning connector has spawned a much larger universe of accessories. Then you’ll want the extra power and the adapter-free lifestyle.

For now, if you’re within your return window you should probably swap for the newest iPad, but if not? Rest assured you’re not really missing that much. Not yet, at least.

Telegraph:

In my testing, battery life seems to have remained the same despite the processor, and so have the cameras. In fact, the camera is one of the places where the impact of the A6X processor can be seen: taking pictures is an astonishingly fast and picture quality is improved thanks to the A6X’s image signal processor.

[Via]

Windows Phone 8: The new horse in the mobile OS race [Review]

Microsoft held an event to introduce the Windows Phone 8 mobile OS right after the introduction of Windows 8. We can say that it is a huge improvement from the previous Windows Phone versions and finally, yes, finally qualified to be in the new player in the mobile OS race dominated by Android and iOS. It is far from perfect yet but it is certainly on the right track, catching up on many functionality on it’s competitors but at the same time differ from them in a good way. We found a very simple yet thorough review of the newly introduced Windows Phone 8 and we would like you to know more about it and be as excited as we are.

The new Start Screen is customizable. Choose from three different sizes of Live Tiles.

When Microsoft launched its totally new Windows Phone 7 mobile operating system two years ago, it signaled Redmond’s first real step into the smartphone market.

The 2-D, tile-based platform was visually stunning, and it showed Microsoft was intent on taking the smartphone operating system into new conceptual territory. It was different, and different looked good.

Windows Phone devices got good reviews for being speedy and intuitive when they rolled out, but people didn’t actually buy them. Windows Phone now commands a meager 3.5 percent of the global smartphone market share today, while iOS and Android dominate the field at around 17 percent and 68 percent respectively, according to IDC (though iOS is significantly higher in the U.S.).

This is still Windows Phone, but more grown up, and now truly ready to challenge the big kids on the playground.

With Windows Phone 8, Microsoft is trying to give its smartphone business another shot in the arm. It’s stacked with new features, as well as enhancements to all the things that made previous versions enjoyable to use. This is still Windows Phone, but more grown up, and now truly ready to challenge the big kids on the playground.

First off, using Windows Phone 8 is as refreshing and fun as using Windows Phone 7.5. It maintains the same colorful, tile-based interface that’s now also shared with Windows 8, yet it still feels new. The new Windows Phone is more slick. Navigation is fast, the apps and the interface are more customizable.

Hardware support that was missing in previous versions is now here: support for multi-core processors, higher screen resolutions, microSD card expansion controls, and built-in NFC. Whether these features show up in the WP8 devices depends on Microsoft’s hardware partners, but the company has tried to make sure nobody will end up choosing another platform purely based on specs.

As for the actual software, the most noticeable improvement is the new Start Screen. The tiles now take up the entire screen — no more empty black right rail — and you can choose between three tile sizes. While this might seem like a small tweak, it makes a big difference for a customized experience. I love being able to now change the size and placement of each app’s tile on my Start Screen to find a configuration that works best for me.

The Live apps, or Live Tiles, still work beautifully in this OS, and now each of the three sizes can support information snippets of different depths. For example, if you make the Calendar app large so it takes up a whole row on the screen, it can show specific information like the length and location of each calendar event. Set the Calendar app to the medium size, and it shows a more condensed version. The smallest size shows just the date.

An event from Calendar, Kid’s Corner, and the Windows Phone Store

The Windows Phone 8 Lock Screen also becomes its own useful Live Tile. You can choose a few apps that will show quick status updates on the screen, and one that will show detailed notifications. This is similar to Notification Center in iOS, though you can only choose five apps for this Lock Screen experience. I did appreciate having one constant app that showed more information. I used Calendar, and it was great to see what I had coming up at a glance.

The web browser is now Internet Explorer 10, and it’s a big improvement. It’s incredibly quick; not once did I grow irritated with sluggish performance. If I had decent Wi-Fi — or at least a couple bars of service — IE10 worked great. It was stunningly fast when I had full bars on HSPA+, and I can’t imagine anybody will have complaints on a 4G LTE network.

The web browser is now Internet Explorer 10, and it’s a big improvement.

The IE10 address bar button can now be customized with one of three functions: Stop/Refresh (the default), Favorites, and Tabs. This little gimmick is not intuitive. It took me a minute to figure out how to open a new tab: by tapping the “More” menu, and then tapping “Tabs.” Swapping tabs shouldn’t be a multi-tap process, so I ended up setting the Tabs function as the default on my address bar button. A better solution would be a quick gesture for switching through tabs so I can keep the refresh button on the address bar.

Sure, that’s nitpicking. But that’s the great thing about Windows Phone 8: All of my complaints are pretty minor and quirky. I’ve grown to really prefer Windows Phone to Android, and can imagine people switching from there. I didn’t experience any crashes or stuttering during the several days I used a new HTC 8X loaded with WP8 as my sole phone. Usually, I depend on an iPhone 4 running iOS 6. The only things I missed were iMessage, since so many of my friends and family use iPhones, and my favorite day-to-day apps like Instagram, Path, and public-transportation apps.

I’ll talk more about the lack of apps later, but first: Maps. All eyes are on Windows Phone’s mapping capability since Apple fumbled the maps in iOS 6. And alas, WP8′s built-in Maps app is suspiciously missing public transportation directions on non-Nokia devices. Windows Phone’s maps app is built on Nokia’s maps platform, and for the most part, it’s accurate and useful. But on non-Nokia phones like the HTC 8X, it looks like public transit directions didn’t make the cut, which is incredibly unfortunate. It does, however, make sense for Nokia, which wants its phones to have unique software offerings, and when you buy a Nokia Lumia phone, you’ll get an “enhanced” map app. Bare Windows Phone 8 Maps still gets the job done. It has turn-by-turn directions, downloadable offline maps, traffic updates, and aerial views. I didn’t get lost once while using the app to navigate Brooklyn on foot. In short: It works, even if you have to figure out which bus to catch and where.

I tested the other new features like Kids Corner, Xbox Music and Videos, Skype integration, the improved Camera app (for which you can collect third-party Lenses), Office, and OneNote. Each worked without problems. The updated SkyDrive makes it easy to access and save files, and every Windows Phone 8 user gets 7GB of free storage. (If Microsoft’s trying to be cute with a weird number, why not 8GB?) I imagine business-oriented people who depend on Office will love the built-in Office hub, which supports Word, Excel and PowerPoint. By saving to SkyDrive, you can start a Word Doc on your phone and pick up where you left off on a computer, or vice versa. Kids Corner is also a good tool for parents with young children; it sequesters your kids — who cannot be trusted — to their own child-proof area of the phone.

The multitasking capabilities in Windows Phone 8 have been updated, and for the most part, it’s smoother. Apps can run in the background, and Windows Phone 8 will remember where you left off in a previously used app. For example, if you’re in the middle of tapping out a text, you can leave, go do something else, and then tap the back button to return where you left off with the text intact. One glitch: If I left the Messaging app in the middle of a text, and then went back by tapping the Messaging tile from the Start Screen, it wouldn’t remember where I left off. I had to tap the built-in back button, or tap and hold the back button for the “Task-switcher display,” which shows thumbnails of most recently used apps.

Beyond a few such quirks — and to be fair, every OS has its share — Windows Phone 8′s biggest problem is its lack of volume.

There are more than 120,000 apps available for Windows Phone. They just aren’t the apps you want.

Just like Windows 8, Microsoft’s smartphone OS doesn’t have enough app-makers on board yet. It’s lame to admit, but the main reason I don’t want to switch to Windows Phone 8 is because I don’t want to give up Instagram, and I’ve heard the same sentiment from Android and iPhone users alike. Instagram is a true “killer app,” and there are likely countless potential switchers with a similar complaint. The platform’s also missing the latest app fads that all your friends are addicted to. Take Letterpress, for example, the breakout word game released last week that currently has iPhone users staying up until 3 a.m. Windows Phone doesn’t have it — it only just now got Draw Something, months after it peaked.

Nonetheless, Microsoft continues to assure us it’s getting developers to create Windows Phone apps. Maybe we’ll even see Instagram in the near future. Windows Phone does core basics like Kindle, Facebook, Twitter, Zite and (just announced) Pandora. And it’s not like the store is empty — there are more than 120,000 apps available. They just aren’t the apps you want.

The other volume problem is the tiny user base. It’s most noticeable in the new “Rooms” feature in the People hub, where you can have group chats, or share albums, calendars and notes. Since I don’t know anybody who uses a Windows Phone, this feature was totally useless. I’d love to tell you it works great, but I have no way of knowing.

GOOD Slick, intuitive interface with nice animations that just works. Customizable Live Tiles and Lock Screen. People hub, which centralizes your social activity, is incredibly handy. IE10 is fast and smooth. Support for better handset hardware. Improved camera software is easy to use. Comes with wireless data tracking tool Data Sense. Built-in Office is a boon for business users. More room for developers to take advantage of. Hopefully to build a better ecosystem.

BAD Key apps are missing. Windows Store is cluttered, with reviews appearing in different languages. Rooms is useless unless you know a lot of Microsoft employees. Multitasking has some strange bugs. Same annoyance from WP7 persist. There is not one big improvement, just many small improvements. Incompatible with any of the current devices.

Our Verdict: Windows Phone 8 can do everything you expect a mobile operating system to do. If you just need a simple and basic functionality of a smartphone and doing every task without any interference, the Windows Phone 8 is certainly the mobile OS for you. But the downside is that you probably will not be the first to get certain apps or will never get them anytime soon or ever since developers wont be developing for Windows platform as the first OS or will ever considering to develop for it. This all will heavily rely on the user base of Windows Phone 8 in the upcoming months. The ecosystem is not matured yet in our opinion but apart from that Windows Phone 8 is a great OS which offers a new experience for everyone who are looking for something different and unconventional out there. You be the judge.

[Via]