Almost Half Of Top iPad Apps Are Unavailable Or Unoptimized For Android Tablets

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Almost half of the top 50 apps on iPad are unavailable or have not been optimized for competing devices that run Google’s Android operating system. That’s according to a new report from Canalys, which believes Google should be doing more to encourage top developers to build high-quality tablet apps for its platform.

The data from Canalys shows that 30% of the top 50 iPad apps weren’t available at all on Android-powered tablets, while another 18% were there but they were not optimized for larger displays — they were simply smartphone apps that were automatically scaled up to fit a tablet screen.

That means just 52% of top iPad apps were also available on Android tablets.

“Quite simply, building high-quality app experiences for Android tablets has not been among many developers’ top priorities to date,” said Tim Shepherd, Canalys Senior Analyst.

“That there are over 375,000 apps in the Apple App Store that are designed with iPad users in mind, versus just a fraction of this – in the low tens of thousands – available through Google Play, underscores this point.”

Canalys does expect this to change as Android-powered tablets become more popular, but it still believes that “Google needs to do more to encourage greater numbers of developers to invest in delivering high-quality Android tablet apps quickly.”

If it doesn’t, the search giant runs the risk of “disappointing consumers with weak app experiences in the short term.”

Of course, one of the issues with Android, which can sometimes drive developers away from the platform, is piracy. Google’s “open” approach means it’s too easy for users to download and install apps from other sources without paying for them.

Back in July, we wrote about a game called Gentlemen! that had attracted over 6,000 players on Android during its first few weeks on Google Play. That’s an impressive number of players, until you consider that only 50 actually paid for the game, while the rest downloaded it illegally.

As a result of this, many developers choose to avoid Android altogether, while other must find different ways of finding revenue — such as ads. Of the 52% of top iPad apps also available on Google Play, six were titles that were paid on iOS, but were free and ad-supported on Android.

Canalys analyst Daniel Matte points out that while these titles may be free, they “typically deliver a poorer and often more limited user experience, sometimes taking a considerable toll on device battery life and often subjecting users to unskippable [sic] videos or other unpopular intrusions.”

With Google seeing lots of demand for the new Nexus 7, and Android tablets now commanding a larger market share than the iPad, it’s never been more important for it to put more focus on tablet apps.

Canalys believes it can do this by increasing the revenue potential of Google Play, and by changing the Play Store to “ensure more rigorously managed, high-quality, optimized experiences are highlighted, to the benefit of consumers, and to reward those developers who invest the time and resources in building them with improved discoverability.”

[Via, Source]

Buy iPhone 5 without contract from Apple Malaysia online store, SenHeng or SenQ

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For those who wanted to buy the iPhone 5 and dont want to get it tied up with contract from Maxis, Digi or Celcom but instead prefers to get it outright, well Apple Malaysia online store is now selling iPhone 5. Same goes to SenHeng and SenQ nationwide. But stocks appears to be limited in SenHeng and SenQ now.

But if you buy from Apple Malaysia online store now, it will ship in 2-4 business days. Which is great. If you buy today, you will get it in under a week.

The retail price for iPhone 5 goes like this:

iPhone 5 16GB – RM2,199
iPhone 5 32GB – RM2,499
iPhone 5 64GB – RM2,799

I personally own the black model but the white model does look great also. And the white is less prone to scratches apparently. But my black model is fine so far. The choice is yours!

To get the iPhone 5 from Apple Malaysia online store, click here!

If you prefer getting the phone cheaper with a contract, click here to see the comparison between all iPhone 5 plans from Malaysian telco.

Please support us and like us on Facebook on the right pane!

Malaysian iPhone 5 plans comparison: Maxis vs Digi vs Celcom

121212-digi-iphone-5-launch-detailsThe Plans for iPhone 5 are all out from the big three: Maxis, Digi and Celcom. But how does the plans do compared to each other? Which is the plan that suits you most or give you the best value for money? Which is the cheapest among all? So you are all confused now on which plan should you go for and you are so undecided. Well, this will definitely help you in making that decision. Here is how the iPhone plans from Maxis, Digi and Celcom compared:

Maxis vs Digi vs Celcom!

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From the comparison above, we can see that Digi has the cheapest total cost of ownership compared to the rest. But if you consider the bundled calls, SMS and MMS from Digi’s plan, they are not as good as Maxis. For me, I think that Maxis provide the most value for money plans for iPhone 5 compared to Digi and Celcom. Except for the iValue Simple. In my opinion, it is not as good as it looks. It is cheap, and that’s all. I would prefer iDigi 88 than iValue Simple.

And the best part is, Maxis no longer charges for data when the data quota is exceeded. Only the speed will be throttled. But even a throttled data speed for Maxis is considered fast because the speed is reduced by 3 fold, unlike Digi or Celcom which the data will be throttler to a sad 256kbps. But note that the free SMS that comes with Maxis plans are Maxis to Maxis only. SMS to other operators will be charged.

For Celcom, a combination of calls, SMS and MMS of up to 1500 will be given. That will make it more flexible for people instead of having a fix number of minutes and SMS. And Celcom plans also comes with a huge amount of Data. So if you are someone who seldom call and SMS but uses data alot, Celcom might be the best for you.

In conclusion:

Maxis

Good: Best value for money (excluding iValue Simple). Good coverage. Excellent internet speed. Get free 1000 minutes calls for Maxis to Maxis in your contract period.
Bad: More pricey compared to the others. Concern on bill shock. iValue Simple sucks.

Digi

Good: Cheapest plans for iPhone 5. Low monthly commitment compared to the others.

Bad: Only 24 months contract. Not as powerful coverage. Slow internet speed. iPhone 5 price only subsidized a little.

Celcom

Good: Flexible calls/SMS/MMS plan. Huge amount of data. Good coverage and average internet speed.

Bad: Too little calls/SMS bundled. Most expensive when value for money is concerned.

With this, I hope you can decide better on which plan to go for when you plan to get you iPhone 5. Well maybe you have already decided, but this can make things a little bit clearer to you. So basically if you want a cheaper plan, go for Digi, if you want something with the best value for money, Maxis is the best, if you are looking for flexibility and huge amount of data, there is none other than Celcom.

Enjoy your iPhone 5 people! If you have any questions, please feel free to ask me. And please share this with your friends and family!

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*if you want to use the comparison chart, please at least acknowledge me. Thanks!

Maxis introduces new cheaper iValue Simple iPhone 5 Plan

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Maxis just recently announces another plan to join the iValue plans for iPhone 5 coming this Friday. This plan will be targeted to the more budget tight market. The plan just requires monthly commitment of RM50 for a 12 months contract and you will get a small subsidy for your iPhone 5.

Phone 5 16GB – RM2,079
iPhone 5 32GB – RM2,339
iPhone 5 64GB – RM2,699
iPhone 4S 16GB – RM1,769
iPhone 4 8GB – RM1,239

The plan gives you 200mins to all operators, 100SMS to Maxis and 1GB data. It looks like a good solution for those who wanted to take Maxis line but doesnt want to pay RM100 or more a month. But if you take a closer look, after some calculation, it is not really worth it. [Click on the image for a closer look on the plan]

Here is why:

iValue 1:

1 year: RM1200 commitment + RM1699 iPhone price = RM2899

iValue Simple:

1 year: RM600 commitment + RM2079 iPhone price = RM2679

The iValue 1 is just RM220 more expensive than iValue Simple which is around RM18 extra/month. With that, you will get more calls, SMS, and data. I think the iValue Simple is just not that simple after all. If you really want to get a cheaper monthly commitment plan, go for Digi’s iDigi 88 plan. That is a better choice. But you have to sacrifice internet speed and coverage for that. SO the choice is yours!

Check out plans from Digi and Celcom!

For more information on the iValue Simple plan, click here!

If you have any question at all, feel free to drop us a comment on the comment section! Thanks!

Celcom finally reveals it’s unconventional plan for iPhone 5, starting from RM98/Month [Updated]

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Celcom has revealed the plan for iPhone 5 to those who registered their interest on iPhone 5 with Celcom. So I who registered myself got an email from Celcom with the plan like above. Celcom is doing it the unconventional way without any tailored made iPhone plans like they do previously and like how Digi and Maxis still does. But instead, they offer iPhone 5 with a subsidized price when you sign 12 months and 24 months contract of the bundled Celcom First Plan + Mobile internet.

The plan is like the image above, please click on the image for a larger clearer look.

So basically, you can choose between 4 choices of plans which includes:

Celcom First Prime (RM40) + 1.05GB free data + Mobile internet 3GB (RM58) = RM98/month
Celcom First Prime (RM40) + 1.05GB free data + Mobile Internet 5GB (RM88) = RM128/month
Celcom First Premier (RM80) + 1.1GB free data + Mobile Internet 5GB (RM88) = RM168/month
Celcom First Elite (RM150) + 1.2GB free data + Mobile Internet 5GB (RM88) = RM238/month

These plans from Celcom does look good and feel different from those conventional iPhone plans. The bundled talk time, SMS and MMS varies depending on which Celcom First plan you take. And they offers monthly rebates also that also varies depending on your iPhone 5 model.

For more information, Click here.

If there are any questions, please feel free to ask! Thanks.

Cant make up your mind on which plan and which telco to go for? Stay tuned for the plan comparison! Coming soon!

See plans from Digi here and Maxis here!

UPDATE: Celcom plans are out in their website. Click here!

iPad mini vs Nexus 7 Drop Test [Video]

As always, we bring you the drop test for the latest device you cared about. Although drop test dont usually mean anything at all. You wont buy your device based on how well it will fair in drops. Or you like to buy a tablet and drop it everyday then we have no comment. Anyway, this is the drop test between iPad mini and Nexus 7 from Android Authority. Who will fair better?

iPad mini and 4th Generation iPad review round-up [Review]

Ahead of the iPad Mini and fourth-generation iPad becoming available to customers Friday, early reviews of both devices have hit the web. You can see in the collection below that the reviews are fairly positive, discussing how great the build quality is, the lightness of the tablet, and how well it fits in your hand. Starting with the iPad mini:

The Loop:

I use my iPad mini for tasks rather than watching videos or playing games, but I use it a lot. This is a Wi-Fi model, which was on all the time and I have yet to see anything cause a significant drain on the battery. The battery is lasting days for me and it is on 24/7.

Engadget:

In fact we found the brightness and color reproduction to be improved over the iPad 2, comparable to the latest Retina displays. Colors are very pleasing to the eye and viewing angles, as ever with an Apple display, do not disappoint. You can line up as many friends as you like and sit them shoulder-to-shoulder, they’ll all have a bright, clear picture. Yes, mini owners may have to make do with some resolution envy, but they at least won’t be lacking in any other regard.

The Verge:

And it does raise the floor here. There’s no tablet in this size range that’s as beautifully constructed, works as flawlessly, or has such an incredible software selection. Would I prefer a higher-res display? Certainly. Would I trade it for the app selection or hardware design? For the consistency and smoothness of its software, or reliability of its battery? Absolutely not. And as someone who’s been living with (and loving) Google’s Nexus 7 tablet for a few months, I don’t say that lightly.

TechCrunch:

While we’re on the subject of the screen, let’s not beat around the bush — if there is a weakness of this device, it’s the screen. But that statement comes with a very big asterisk. As someone who is used to a “retina” display on my phone, tablet, and even now computer, the downgrade to a non-retina display is quite noticeable. This goes away over time as you use the iPad mini non-stop, but if you switch back a retina screen, it’s jarring.

Telegraph:

On the other hand, what will make some think twice about buying an iPad mini is the price. Starting at £269 for a WiFi only model, this is £100 dearer than the Kindle Fire HD or the Nexus 7, which is now available in a 16GB version for £159.

Whether it’s worth it depends on how much of a premium you put on great design and a vast ecosystem of apps. Apple will sell a lot of these little beauties, that’s for sure.

TIME:

Even though this screen isn’t state of the art, it’s O.K. If you’ve ever laid your eyeballs on the ultra-smooth text rendered by the Retina iPad, its text will look fuzzy by comparison, especially at teensier type sizes. But the tradeoff it presents compared to the 7-inchers — fewer pixels, but more space — is reasonable enough.

AllThingsD:

In shrinking the iconic iPad, Apple has pulled off an impressive feat. It has managed to create a tablet that’s notably thinner and lighter than the leading small competitors with 7-inch screens, while squeezing in a significantly roomier 7.9-inch display. And it has shunned the plastic construction used in its smaller rivals to retain the iPad’s sturdier aluminum and glass body.

Guardian:

What will surprise you is the weight. The specs already show that the iPad mini is lighter than the Kindle Fire, 308g v 395g (and 340g for the Nexus 7); even if you add on a Smart Cover, it’s still lighter than the uncovered Kindle Fire. It’s thinner too. This is a device that will be ideal for holding in one hand for reading on train rides or other commuting; or you might even forget it’s in that coat pocket.

SlashGear:

Apple quotes up to 10hrs of wireless browsing over Wi-Fi for the iPad mini, or up to 9hrs if you’re using the tablet’s cellular connection. In practice, with a mixture of browsing, some video playback, games, music – both locally-stored and streaming – and messaging, we comfortably exceeded Apple’s estimate. In fact, we exceeded 11hrs of use before encountering a battery warning.

Fox News:

Those tablets don’t have the complete experience that the iPad does. Come on: The iPad is still the gold standard for tablet computing after all. With stellar hardware and hundreds of thousands of apps, the iPad is the Kleenex of facial tissue. The Tivo of DVRs. It has all the perks of using an iOS device: AppStore, iMessages, FaceTime, etc. 

Moving on to the 4th gen iPad:

TechCrunch:

If you were going to get an iPad before, obviously, you’ll want to get this one now. In fact, you don’t even have a choice — Apple has discontinued the third-generation model. The prices remain the same across the board as do all of the other features (WiFi/LTE, Retina display, etc).

Yes, it is kind of lame for those of us who bought third-generation models that Apple updated the line so quickly, but well, that’s Apple. To me, the fourth-generation leap doesn’t seem to be nearly as big as the leap from the first to second generation or from the second to third generation, so perhaps take some solace in that.

SlashGear:

The third-generation iPad arguably didn’t need refreshing; in fact, if Apple hadn’t opted to change to Lightning, it could realistically have held off changing its largest tablet until early 2013, as per its typical yearly refresh cycle. That makes for a reasonably straightforward upgrade decision if you’re a 3rd-gen iPad owner. Unless you’re desperate for Lightning – perhaps you’ve also got an iPhone 5, and want to use all the same accessories rather than buy the adapter dongle – then we’re yet to see apps that really demand the potent A6X chipset.

The Verge:

The fourth-generation iPad is the very definition of an iterative change: Apple made important things better, but neither overhauled nor revolutionized anything. If the iPad’s history is any indication, the fourth-generation iPad’s advantages over the third-gen model will be most apparent two years from now, when apps are designed for the better processor and the Lightning connector has spawned a much larger universe of accessories. Then you’ll want the extra power and the adapter-free lifestyle.

For now, if you’re within your return window you should probably swap for the newest iPad, but if not? Rest assured you’re not really missing that much. Not yet, at least.

Telegraph:

In my testing, battery life seems to have remained the same despite the processor, and so have the cameras. In fact, the camera is one of the places where the impact of the A6X processor can be seen: taking pictures is an astonishingly fast and picture quality is improved thanks to the A6X’s image signal processor.

[Via]